About

About

Jordan Buschur comes from a long line of collectors, and her paintings reflect this proclivity towards amassing objects. An artist, educator, and curator, she received an M.F.A. from Brooklyn College, the City University of New York. Her work has been shown internationally, including exhibitions with the Center for Book Arts (New York), Tiger Strikes Asteroid (New York), and Vox Populi. She was a community teaching resident at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts and the Sheldon Museum of Art and completed residencies at Chashama North, the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and the Vermont Studio Center. Awards include the Kimmel Foundation Artist Award and the Charles Shaw Painting Award. Her artwork has been featured on the Creative Boom, Jealous Curator, and Young Space, among others. She has curated exhibitions at Cuchifritos Gallery and Spring/Break Art Show, both in New York City. Buschur is the former Director of the Eisentrager-Howard Gallery at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln and the Prescott Gallery, Lincoln, NE. She currently works with The Arts Commission, Toledo, OH and The Neon Heater Art Gallery, Findlay, OH.

Statement
My paintings implant ordinary objects with psychological meanings, implying a human presence through depictions of accumulated collections. These collections, ranging from books to junk drawers to piles of empty boxes, focus on the oscillation between the private meaning and public presentation. Painting the array of collected objects is an act of meditation on my relationship with the owner, as I dwell on the mundane detail of their accumulated junk. However, the paintings stop short of functioning as a portrait of an individual through their amassed objects. Instead, the collections signify the material weight of modern life, the anxiety of consumption, and the anonymity of personal effects.

I begin the book paintings by creating an installation of books, photographing it, and then painting from the photographs individually or collaged together. The books are often piled, jumbled, and stacked. Through the act of painting, the arrangements become precarious, or the books change scale- in each scenario the books are located just outside of reality. The text on the paintings is occasionally drawn from the original text on the books, but often is invented. These small groups of words steer the painting towards other meanings and offer hints at the content of the books. The closed (and occasionally blank) books have the potential to contain anything- primers, secrets, romances, how-to guides, theories, handbooks for improvement. They remain closed; impenetrable, or conversely, open to any possibility. The physical nature of the arrangement of books combined with the mutable meaning of the text places the paintings in the unsteady area between reality and invention.

The patterned boxes were photographed in a warehouse flea market and may be recognizable to a cheap perfume collector from another era. Here, the propensity to collect purely for the sake of building a collection (instead of for use, how could anyone wear that much perfume) is on full display. The boxes sit stacked for sale, every shelf or drawer is eventually emptied, the collector is no longer collecting.